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20121027
20121027
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
probably the worst hurricanes in the gulf coast in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so
massachusetts. by the way, one of them was louisiana that had been hit by hurricane katrina. he talked a lot about small businesses, still talks about it. says i'm a business guy, i know about small businesses. massachusetts when he was governor ranked 48th in small business creation. one of the two states that ranked lower was louisiana that had gotten hit by hurricane katrina. so this is a guy who has a track record of saying one thing and doing something else. on the other hand, when i ran four years ago, i made promises, too. i promised to cut taxes for middle class families and i did by $3,600. i promised to cut taxes for small business owners and i did 18 times. i promised to end tax-payer funded wall street bailouts and we have. by the way, we got every dime worth of money we used for the bank rescue and got interest with it, too. i promise to take on those financial institutions charging too much for student loans. we were able to make college more affordable for millions of americans. i promised i would never walk away from the millions of jobs that were in jeopardy when the auto in
mcantile exchange when katrina came along and i saw prices explode and that was really tough. could we see something like that again? >> just like everybody has been saying at least all the forecasters, we haven't seen a storm run this pattern this late, this expected path. it will be very interesting to see what plays out. how much damage there is. the storm may come in during high tide. we'll have to see what the implications are. we'll beatching the refineries specifically. melissa: yeah. >> what damage happens. i certaiy don't expect that we'll see the implications we did with hurricane katrina because, quite frankly the east coast is not the refining mecca. it is not the oil producing mea that the gulf was but there certainly could still bempacts nonetheless. melissa: here is what i care about. i'm driving home from work today. should i fillp today? should it get worse over the weekend? should i wait until next week? what is my play here? >> well, you know, playing it before the storm comes would be wise. not necessarily going to be a huge increase in price. in fact if everybody goes
not to have prepared people properly for this and it becomes another mini katrina situation, it could be literally an election wrecker for the president. conversely, if he handles this very well and it is a huge storm, that can win him the election. it can be politically very important. >> let's be clear. the record is obvious to me, the president has -- we saw what happened in the past in katrina. the president has been very aggressive putting his own boots on the ground. he came through the state of new jersey when we had flooding and the like. so this president to me, he's already proven that point and i know, i know from my work in preparing today, that the federal government is ready for this challenge and they will meet it head-on and deal with the crisis and the aftermath. and i know it's a political issue but i really want to reaffirm to people because the biggest mistakes i've seen often in these storms, especially in the obama administration, has not necessarily been the federal response, it's been from individuals not taking the necessary steps to be ready. and then in the
are the first major u.s. city to (inaudible) post katrina where he saw firsthand where a critical role these systems played in the city's recovery. i am honored to chair the council because i feel it's crucial that the public sector work side by side with our private sector partners to do everything we can today to ensure we will meet the needs of our residents in the days, weeks and years after a disaster. the objective of the lifeline council are to develop and improve collaboration in the city and county across regions regularly -- to develop and improve collaboration in the city and across the region by regularly convening a group of senior level operation officers of local and regional life line providers, understanding intersystem dependencies of enhancing planning, restoration and reconstruction, share information about the recovery plans and priorities and establish coordination process for life lines restoration and recovery following a major disaster. i'm going to go back to the last slide and just say today's conversation i want to focus around the specific challenges that
on those contingencies. but we look at the national response framework. it was rewritten post katrina. and another key part of partnerships, when i was the federal on scene coordinator during deep water horizon, it's not in the national response framework, but every parish president, every mayor, every governor had a coast guard liaison officer at the oak pride and above level. so, if they didn't like how the response was going, go to my liaison officer. don't go to anderson cooper and then cause the white house to react to what they're seeing on cnn. so, how do you get in front of that news cycle? and the only way you can do that as tip o'neill said, all things in politics are local and i think we heard from vice admiral nathan that i think all responses are local as well. and, so, we really need to start most importantly at the local level, at those planning levels, because the first shot of any campaign, the plan will change, but the partnerships need to remain constant. >> and, general baldwin, we heard from colonel span owe about now your three hats of authority, your state hat,
. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pendleton depending on your deployment cycle what fleet week can bring to bear. and we need to find a way, perhaps dcl, north palm being the broker of that, to maintain a better capabilities database so we know what is immediately available because under our old constructs, if we needed a
disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the thin
, victor. >> always storm politics, we saw after it after katrina and after any natural or man-made disa disaster. let's talk about these schedules. they have made changes and, as of now, the president will still campaign in new hampshire today and romney headed to florida. what do we know about their schedules moving forward? >> well, as you mentioned, romney still headed to where i am in pensacola and other stops on the schedule today, as well. vice president biden, one of his events in virginia has been canceled and some other cancellations, as well. we'll look to see as we go into sunday and monday what happens with the schedule. both campaign as keeping a very close eye on this storm and affects not only the campaign, the campaigning by the candidates, but also the get out the vote efforts in the key battleground states. all this could be affected, victor? >> paul steinhauser in pensaco a pensacola, thank you. >>> an coulter sent a tweet and she was on piers morgan last night where piers ask her about her intentions. >> why did you call -- >> at the end of the third debate. >> right
about, we've been through this before. multiple times, hurricane katrina, hugo, et cetera, et cetera. the snow-ma geddon to hit the east coast, each time people thought this is it. they spike for a little bit. 24, 48 hours and then come back to where they were before. >> brenda: jonas? do you have any concerns about this? hurricane isaac when it hit, caused the biggest jump in gas prices in 18 months. >> and in this case, no, in connecticut i couldn't drive because there were trees down and your mobility goes down to the point where fuel consumption will drop as much as refining capacity unless it freakingly hits the refinery because you can't get to work, major power outages, no power for a week and you're not consuming energy when you can't turn on the power and can't get to work in your car. so it's a good thing, but keep the gas price froms going bananas in the first place. >> brenda: the east coast provides 6 1/2% of the gas that the u.s. uses. that's kinds of a-- could be a hit. >> i don't think it's going to be a very big hit. look, the prices may well go up, even if just one
hit by hurricane katrina. he talks a lot about small businesses, still talks about it. says i'm a business guy, i know about small businesses. massachusetts when he was governor ranked 48th in small business creation. and one of the two states that ranked lower was louisiana that had gotten hit by hurricane katrina. so this is a guy who has a track record of saying one thing and doing something else. on the other hand -- on the other hand, when i ran four years ago, i made promises, too. i promised to cut taxes for middle class families. and i did. by $3,600. i promised to cut taxes for small business owners. and i did, 18 times. i promised to end taxpayer funded wall street bailouts, and we have. and by the way, we got every dime worth of money we used for the bank rescue, and we got interest with it, too. i promise to take on those financial institutions that were charging too much for student loans, and we were able to make college more affordable for millions of americans. i promised i would never walk away from the millions of jobs that were in jeopardy when the auto indu
of catastrophe. 9/11, darfur, katrina, two wars in afghanistan and iraq, economic b instability, in the 2008 election, president obama captured our diversity in his being and his breath and organizing for many of us for him, felt like a social movement. it felt like ushering in a new era of our history. strategist martial gantz talks about how there was no concerted effort to keep the base mobilized, to make that grassroots movement continue to feel like a movement. four years later it's no surprise the president is not distancesed, is not removed. the new question will be whether millennial will equate their political disillusionment with the idea that their vote doesn't matter. >> it absolutely does. we'll talk more about how votes matter as soon as we get back. we've got more on this week in voter suppression. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles.
about the levees in new orleans today without ever mentioning hurricane katrina. no one would do it. it's nonsensical. there is so little context provided about dodd-frank that you would think it is the product of immaculate conception. there is no antecedent events. it's amazing. that's why when opponents want to talk about growth rate, what was it they started with? 2010. nothing happened before that. it's inexplicable, right clicks so of course, will not often mentioned, the dodd-frank act was passed because of the 2009 financial crisis, which was the worst since the crash of 1929 and it delivered us the worst economy since the great depression of the 30s. how come it's a really mentioned? because the financial industry, lawyers, lobbyists, allies and broader influence industry has purchased has been wildly successful in changing the subject of the debate from the financial crisis, wall street's role in it and the cost to the country to, drumroll, the financial reform of regulations implementing it and the cost to them, the industry. it is truly remarkable how much time is spent talk
of liberalism. built on the bones two of disasters wars, the incompetent of the reaction to katrina and a ruin in the economy. four years later, what the hell happened? that's my first question. [laughter] >> that's hey, that's what "pity the billionaire: the hard-times swindle and the unlikely comeback of the right is about. and if you all want to you're going have to read the whole thing. that is in very brief form what the book is about. we came to it four years ago we came to a turning point in the country, we didn't turn. you know, -- [laughter] and before i start blabbing about that. let me say how nice it is to be here in austin, texas thank you for inviting me. it i love a book festival where you can buy a corn dog. [laughter] [applause] that's awesome. okay. but back to the sort of story of our times. to pick up on what president obama was say -- paul was saying in 2008 i live in washington, d.c., now. every pundit in the city was saying conservativism is done. it's days over. we followed the economic recipe. look what happened. not to mention all the substantials, tom delay, the katr
. that is like talking about the levees in new orleans today without ever mentioning hurricane katrina. no one would do it. it is nonsensical. there is usually so little context provided about dodd frank did you would think it was the product of immaculate conception. there was no and to set -- antecedent of that. what was the date he started with? 2010. nothing happened before that. inexplicable. of course the dodd frank act was passed because of the two dozen 8-2009 financial crisis which was the worst financial crisis since 1929 and delivered the worst economy since the great depression. how come it is so rarely mentioned? because the financial industry, its lobbyists, allies, has been wildly successful in changing the subject and the debate from the financial crisis, wall street's role in in the cost to the country to the financial reform law regulations implementing it in the cost to them. the industry. it is truly remarkable how much time is spent talking about the self-serving claims of cost to the industry to put financial reform in place. to prevent that industry from crashing the fin
it was katrina or other events we've actually been able to bring in national guard platforms to provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfer that to an air to air victor
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)